Webbgirl's Squee

Warning: I may yell for the kids to get off my lawn at any moment.

664 notes

kellysue:

andtheother:

Very pleased with how my son’s geektastic nursery turned out, so thought I’d make a post about it. When my partner and I first started planning it, we talked about doing a strict superhero theme. That changed during the process of picking the characters that we wanted to hang on the wall. We decided to go with characters we truly love, regardless of the fandom, rather than pick less-beloved characters just for the sake of fitting an artificially-created superhero theme. Thus, we ended up with fabulous drawings of Wonder Woman, the Ninth Doctor, Harry Potter, Captain Marvel (Carol Danvers), and Mr. Spock, commissioned from artist Jenny Stead. Jenny did an awesome job, and I highly recommend anyone looking for custom art to hit her up when she has commissions available.

Despite the mix of fandoms, the centerpiece of the room obviously is still superheroic — specifically, the design from Captain Marvel’s new uniform splashed across an entire wall. I couldn’t be happier with how the mural turned out (if you’re in or around Atlanta and need a mural for your home or office, I can’t say enough great things about Mimi’s Murals), and love the Captain Marvel emblem for several reasons.

First, it’s just a really damn cool design. Major props to Jamie McKelvie for turning out yet another flawless character design/re-design (and one that looks fabulous blown up to a 8x15 foot canvas.)

Second, Carol Danvers flat out rocks. I’ve only known Carol for a little while, starting with Kelly Sue DeConnick’s amazingly kickass Captain Marvel run, but in a brief period of time she’s managed to become one of my favorite characters ever.  She’s everything a hero should be: brave, selfless, kind, and loyal — but with enough vulnerability and flaws to make her relatable and courageous and oh-so-very human. I just love her. 

Third, I want my son to grow up knowing that he can, should, and will find women who deserve to be his heroes just as much as any man. Our society persists in sending a message that heroic women make acceptable role models for girls or other women, but not so much for boys or men. It’s bullshit and it needs to change. If creators keep making characters with the heroic spirit, emotional resonance, and all around badassedness of Carol Danvers, I am hopeful that one day it will.

AHHHHHHH!!! So GREAT!

605,677 notes

flatbear:

asian:

If you think about it potatoes don’t really get all that much credit

they’re fucking awesome

this one thing here

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can be made into:

different variations of fries

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regular,

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curly,

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waffle.

It can be made into chips

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or ruffly 

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you can make hashbrowns with it

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even a salad

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add some fuckin cheese to those potatoes

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you can have it sliced and diced

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or baked

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you can make tater tots

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hell you can even eat the skin

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or just have little potato nuggets

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thank u potatoes

potato appreciation post

Yes I have reblogged this before. No I will never stop reblogging it.

I have both hashbrowns and roasted potatoes in my freezer. I’m suddenly hungry.

(Source: spoopy-dad)

8,575 notes

The Pornographication of Fitness Needs to Stop

the-exercist:

cardio-and-calculus:

the-exercist:

complexmindsimpleheart:

the-exercist:

Fitness magazines don’t help us get fit. Gazing at images of caricatured breasts, buttocks and biceps gives you the impression this is how a fit body should look, that every fit body needs to be shaped in the same vein. Fitness magazines use exactly these images to “inspire” women to look this way. Yet most of us can’t identify with what we are looking at because we don’t believe ordinary us could ever be them. 

[…] What are we teaching our young women who want desperately to believe that they too can be as ripped and shredded? They don’t realize what it takes to look so tight. They want to be there and harm themselves to reach an almost unattainable ideal. When will it be acceptable to lift heavy, building confidence and brainpower while strengthening your body, not concerning yourself with how cute your bottom looks in booty shorts?

[…] Being fit in a functional rather than sexual way means you are entirely capable of being powerful no matter what your height, bust size, shoe size or hair color. You are empowered from the depths of your DNA because you did the work, you earned your place and you walk confidently because of it. A functionally fit You welcomes all sizes, shapes and colors, your boobs and butt are incidental. What we really need to build in the gym is a sense of self and what we are capable of.

!!! But add boys/men

No.

We’re talking about women right now. 

Or we can talk about everybody because there’s an unrealistic expectation for men as well as women

A word to everyone who reblogs posts with responses like the above:

If you actually cared about men’s issues, you wouldn’t tack them on as an afterthought to a woman’s conversation: You’d instead be actively engaging in dialogues that explore the nuances of men’s problems in society. You wouldn’t simply wait until a woman is speaking and then shout “Yeah, men too!” You’d talk about these things independently and give men the attention that they deserve as individuals, instead of waiting for a woman to do the work, shouldering her aside and then insisting that men be given a spot on the stage too. 

If you actually cared about women’s issues, you wouldn’t demand that they give up their space. You’d recognize that conversations by women and about women are perfectly valid. When a woman is talking about her personal experiences and the way social pressures have affected her life, you wouldn’t allow her to be interrupted or derailed. You wouldn’t actively talk over her or steal away attention, focusing on issues that are outside of her point, until the conversation drifts so far away that you aren’t even discussing women anymore. 

So both now and in the future, my answer here is going to remain the same: Can we talk about everyone?

No.

We’re still talking about women right now. 

(via tehnakki)

Filed under this is such a great response this is why so many of those posts about how we should always include everyone when we're talking about some issues just piss me off

455 notes

evilarison:

natasssssssssshhhhhhhhhha:

comicsalliance:

FIVE THIRTY EIGHT DIGS INTO DEMOGRAPHICS OF SUPERHEROES, FINDS THEY’RE STILL OVERWHELMINGLY MEN
By Matt D. Wilson
Here’s the good news: According to some recent research by FiveThirtyEight.com, the website that applies data to just about everything — most notably, US elections — the ratio of female to male characters in mainstream superhero comics is improving, and more LGBT characters are showing up in Marvel and DC’s pages.
That said, the numbers still aren’t great. “Female characters make up only 30.9 percent of the DC universe and 30.6 percent of the Marvel universe,” the site’s report states. In a world where women are 51 percent of all people, that’s not so representative.
Also of interest: Female comic characters tend to be neutral or good far more than they’re evil. “Bad-aligned men alone outnumbered all women combined,” the report states.
READ MORE

isn’t 30% the cut-off line to when dudes think there’s too many women and they’re taking over?

I don’t understand why you would say that. Women make up half the world, and have been suppressed for centuries. They don’t deserve the treatment they get, especially since the make up half the population. Many girls are becoming a part of these nerd communities and they deserve to be represented. And not just as a sexualized female version of a male character, but an actual original character, because that’s just another example of how people believe women should only be second fiddle, a lesser version of men. So what if men think women are taking over? We’re just demanding the respect the women should have been given all along.

But apparently that’s too much to ask.

I think they were pointing out the correlation of the point when men perceive women as dominating a conversation and the percentage of women represented in comics. It hovers around the same.While I don’t have any solid evidence, I would tend to believe that the numbers aren’t purely coincidental. Even though evidence shows comics are still male dominated on all fronts, many male comic book fans are complaining that women are taking over “their” space.

evilarison:

natasssssssssshhhhhhhhhha:

comicsalliance:

FIVE THIRTY EIGHT DIGS INTO DEMOGRAPHICS OF SUPERHEROES, FINDS THEY’RE STILL OVERWHELMINGLY MEN

By Matt D. Wilson

Here’s the good news: According to some recent research by FiveThirtyEight.com, the website that applies data to just about everything — most notably, US elections — the ratio of female to male characters in mainstream superhero comics is improving, and more LGBT characters are showing up in Marvel and DC’s pages.

That said, the numbers still aren’t great. “Female characters make up only 30.9 percent of the DC universe and 30.6 percent of the Marvel universe,” the site’s report states. In a world where women are 51 percent of all people, that’s not so representative.

Also of interest: Female comic characters tend to be neutral or good far more than they’re evil. “Bad-aligned men alone outnumbered all women combined,” the report states.

READ MORE

isn’t 30% the cut-off line to when dudes think there’s too many women and they’re taking over?

I don’t understand why you would say that. Women make up half the world, and have been suppressed for centuries. They don’t deserve the treatment they get, especially since the make up half the population. Many girls are becoming a part of these nerd communities and they deserve to be represented. And not just as a sexualized female version of a male character, but an actual original character, because that’s just another example of how people believe women should only be second fiddle, a lesser version of men. So what if men think women are taking over? We’re just demanding the respect the women should have been given all along.

But apparently that’s too much to ask.

I think they were pointing out the correlation of the point when men perceive women as dominating a conversation and the percentage of women represented in comics. It hovers around the same.

While I don’t have any solid evidence, I would tend to believe that the numbers aren’t purely coincidental.

Even though evidence shows comics are still male dominated on all fronts, many male comic book fans are complaining that women are taking over “their” space.

64,894 notes

overlordofthelollipopguild:

queensuperwholock:

sherlockedbadwolf24601:

mugglebornheadcanon:

895. Muggleborns wonder why there’s a large group of friendly, teenage ghosts around Hogwarts. They’re led by a funny boy with red hair who likes to joke around with Peeves, and he always says that they’re Dumbledore’s Last Army. 

image

I’ve cried myself dry.

Fuck everything

(Source: cirquereveur, via machtaholic)

Filed under owwwwww I'll be over here in the corner rocking back and forth sobbing.

15,138 notes

descentintotyranny:

Murtaza Hussain — Malala and Nabila: worlds apart
Unlike Malala Yousafzai, Nabila Rehman did not receive a welcoming greeting in Washington DC.
Nov. 1 2013
On October 24, 2012 a Predator drone flying over North Waziristan came upon eight-year old Nabila Rehman, her siblings, and their grandmother as they worked in a field beside their village home. Her grandmother, Momina Bibi, was teaching the children how to pick okra as the family prepared for the coming Eid holiday. However on this day the terrible event would occur that would forever alter the course of this family’s life. In the sky the children suddenly heard the distinctive buzzing sound emitted by the CIA-operated drones - a familiar sound to those in the rural Pakistani villages which are stalked by them 24 hours a day - followed by two loud clicks. The unmanned aircraft released its deadly payload onto the Rehman family, and in an instant the lives of these children were transformed into a nightmare of pain, confusion and terror. Seven children were wounded, and Nabila’s grandmother was killed before her eyes, an act for which no apology, explanation or justification has ever been given.
This past week Nabila, her schoolteacher father, and her 12-year-old brother travelled to Washington DC to tell their story and to seek answers about the events of that day. However, despite overcoming incredible obstacles in order to travel from their remote village to the United States, Nabila and her family were roundly ignored. At the Congressional hearing where they gave testimony, only five out of 430 representatives showed up. In the words of Nabila’s father to those few who did attend: "My daughter does not have the face of a terrorist and neither did my mother. It just doesn’t make sense to me, why this happened… as a teacher, I wanted to educate Americans and let them know my children have been injured."
The translator broke down in tears while recounting their story, but the government made it a point to snub this family and ignore the tragedy it had caused to them. Nabila, a slight girl of nine with striking hazel eyes, asked a simple question in her testimony: “What did my grandmother do wrong?” There was no one to answer this question, and few who cared to even listen. Symbolic of the utter contempt in which the government holds the people it claims to be liberating, while the Rehmans recounted their plight, Barack Obama was spending the same time meeting with the CEO of weapons manufacturer Lockheed Martin.
Selective Memory
It is useful to contrast the American response to Nabila Rehman with that of Malala Yousafzai, a young girl who was nearly assassinated by the Pakistani Taliban. While Malala was feted by Western media figures, politicians and civic leaders for her heroism, Nabila has become simply another one of the millions of nameless, faceless people who have had their lives destroyed over the past decade of American wars. The reason for this glaring discrepancy is obvious. Since Malala was a victim of the Taliban, she, despite her protestations, was seen as a potential tool of political propaganda to be utilized by war advocates. She could be used as the human face of their effort, a symbol of the purported decency of their cause, the type of little girl on behalf of whom the United States and its allies can say they have been unleashing such incredible bloodshed. Tellingly, many of those who took up her name and image as a symbol of the justness of American military action in the Muslim world did not even care enough to listen to her own words or feelings about the subject.
As described by the Washington Post's Max Fisher:

Western fawning over Malala has become less about her efforts to improve conditions for girls in Pakistan, or certainly about the struggles of millions of girls in Pakistan, and more about our own desire to make ourselves feel warm and fuzzy with a celebrity and an easy message. It’s a way of letting ourselves off the hook, convincing ourselves that it’s simple matter of good guys vs bad guys, that we’re on the right side and that everything is okay.

But where does Nabila fit into this picture? If extrajudicial killings, drone strikes and torture are in fact all part of a just-cause associated with the liberation of the people of Pakistan, Afghanistan and elsewhere, where is the sympathy or even simple recognition for the devastation this war has caused to countless little girls such as her? The answer is clear: The only people to be recognized for their suffering in this conflict are those who fall victim to the enemy. Malala for her struggles was to be made the face of the American war effort -  against her own will if necessary - while innumerable little girls such as Nabila will continue to be terrorized and murdered as part of this war without end. There will be no celebrity appearances or awards ceremonies for Nabila. At her testimony almost no one even bothered to attend.
But if they had attended, they would’ve heard a nine year old girl asking the questions which millions of other innocent people who have had their lives thrown into chaos over the past decade have been asking: "When I hear that they are going after people who have done wrong to America, then what have I done wrong to them? What did my grandmother do wrong to them? I didn’t do anything wrong."
Murtaza Hussain is a Toronto-based writer and analyst focused on issues related to Middle Eastern politics.
Follow him on Twitter: @MazMHussain

descentintotyranny:

Murtaza Hussain — Malala and Nabila: worlds apart

Unlike Malala Yousafzai, Nabila Rehman did not receive a welcoming greeting in Washington DC.

Nov. 1 2013

On October 24, 2012 a Predator drone flying over North Waziristan came upon eight-year old Nabila Rehman, her siblings, and their grandmother as they worked in a field beside their village home. Her grandmother, Momina Bibi, was teaching the children how to pick okra as the family prepared for the coming Eid holiday. However on this day the terrible event would occur that would forever alter the course of this family’s life. In the sky the children suddenly heard the distinctive buzzing sound emitted by the CIA-operated drones - a familiar sound to those in the rural Pakistani villages which are stalked by them 24 hours a day - followed by two loud clicks. The unmanned aircraft released its deadly payload onto the Rehman family, and in an instant the lives of these children were transformed into a nightmare of pain, confusion and terror. Seven children were wounded, and Nabila’s grandmother was killed before her eyes, an act for which no apology, explanation or justification has ever been given.

This past week Nabila, her schoolteacher father, and her 12-year-old brother travelled to Washington DC to tell their story and to seek answers about the events of that day. However, despite overcoming incredible obstacles in order to travel from their remote village to the United States, Nabila and her family were roundly ignored. At the Congressional hearing where they gave testimony, only five out of 430 representatives showed up. In the words of Nabila’s father to those few who did attend"My daughter does not have the face of a terrorist and neither did my mother. It just doesn’t make sense to me, why this happened… as a teacher, I wanted to educate Americans and let them know my children have been injured."

The translator broke down in tears while recounting their story, but the government made it a point to snub this family and ignore the tragedy it had caused to them. Nabila, a slight girl of nine with striking hazel eyes, asked a simple question in her testimony: “What did my grandmother do wrong?” There was no one to answer this question, and few who cared to even listen. Symbolic of the utter contempt in which the government holds the people it claims to be liberating, while the Rehmans recounted their plight, Barack Obama was spending the same time meeting with the CEO of weapons manufacturer Lockheed Martin.

Selective Memory

It is useful to contrast the American response to Nabila Rehman with that of Malala Yousafzai, a young girl who was nearly assassinated by the Pakistani Taliban. While Malala was feted by Western media figures, politicians and civic leaders for her heroism, Nabila has become simply another one of the millions of nameless, faceless people who have had their lives destroyed over the past decade of American wars. The reason for this glaring discrepancy is obvious. Since Malala was a victim of the Taliban, she, despite her protestations, was seen as a potential tool of political propaganda to be utilized by war advocates. She could be used as the human face of their effort, a symbol of the purported decency of their cause, the type of little girl on behalf of whom the United States and its allies can say they have been unleashing such incredible bloodshed. Tellingly, many of those who took up her name and image as a symbol of the justness of American military action in the Muslim world did not even care enough to listen to her own words or feelings about the subject.

As described by the Washington Post's Max Fisher:

Western fawning over Malala has become less about her efforts to improve conditions for girls in Pakistan, or certainly about the struggles of millions of girls in Pakistan, and more about our own desire to make ourselves feel warm and fuzzy with a celebrity and an easy message. It’s a way of letting ourselves off the hook, convincing ourselves that it’s simple matter of good guys vs bad guys, that we’re on the right side and that everything is okay.

But where does Nabila fit into this picture? If extrajudicial killings, drone strikes and torture are in fact all part of a just-cause associated with the liberation of the people of Pakistan, Afghanistan and elsewhere, where is the sympathy or even simple recognition for the devastation this war has caused to countless little girls such as her? The answer is clear: The only people to be recognized for their suffering in this conflict are those who fall victim to the enemy. Malala for her struggles was to be made the face of the American war effort -  against her own will if necessary - while innumerable little girls such as Nabila will continue to be terrorized and murdered as part of this war without end. There will be no celebrity appearances or awards ceremonies for Nabila. At her testimony almost no one even bothered to attend.

But if they had attended, they would’ve heard a nine year old girl asking the questions which millions of other innocent people who have had their lives thrown into chaos over the past decade have been asking: "When I hear that they are going after people who have done wrong to America, then what have I done wrong to them? What did my grandmother do wrong to them? I didn’t do anything wrong."

Murtaza Hussain is a Toronto-based writer and analyst focused on issues related to Middle Eastern politics.

Follow him on Twitter: @MazMHussain

(via hildesstuff)

3,536 notes

bethanyactually:

timrous-beastie:

cracked:

NOTE: We don’t have a standard policy of putting trigger warnings on articles, but if there exists anywhere on Earth an article that needs such a warning, here it fucking is. In fact, if this doesn’t disturb you, there is a good chance you are a crazy person.
5 Things I Learned As A Sex Slave in Modern America

#5. Sex Slavery Is a Thriving American Industry
I was 4 or 5 years old when it started.
If you’re expecting my “sold into child slavery” story to begin with guys in ski masks bursting into my bedroom and snatching me up in the night, the actual story is worse, in a way. One night, my stepdad just pulled me out of bed and said, “Come here, uncle needs to see you.” There were zero uncles downstairs. But there were several creepy, creepy men who passed me around from lap to lap and paid him for the privilege. If you’re asking yourself where my mother was, well, she was right there, watching.

Read More

Fucking hell
"human trafficking (forcing someone into labor or sex acts against their will) is a $9.5 billion industry in the USA — to pick a random comparison, that’s four times what the Burger King chain takes in”

"Recent stats found 83 percent of sex trafficking incidents in the U.S. involved victims that were U.S. citizens, and nearly half of those were minors — just like I was. It’s estimated that right now 300,000 kids are in this situation or are at risk. Just this June, the FBI freed 168 kids who’d been sold into sex slavery across 106 American cities. Since 2008, at least 4,000 kids have been freed from similar operations. Six years. So, yeah, my story is as isolated an incident as the existence of Walmart stores.”

bethanyactually:

timrous-beastie:

cracked:

NOTE: We don’t have a standard policy of putting trigger warnings on articles, but if there exists anywhere on Earth an article that needs such a warning, here it fucking is. In fact, if this doesn’t disturb you, there is a good chance you are a crazy person.

5 Things I Learned As A Sex Slave in Modern America

#5. Sex Slavery Is a Thriving American Industry

I was 4 or 5 years old when it started.

If you’re expecting my “sold into child slavery” story to begin with guys in ski masks bursting into my bedroom and snatching me up in the night, the actual story is worse, in a way. One night, my stepdad just pulled me out of bed and said, “Come here, uncle needs to see you.” There were zero uncles downstairs. But there were several creepy, creepy men who passed me around from lap to lap and paid him for the privilege. If you’re asking yourself where my mother was, well, she was right there, watching.

Read More

Fucking hell

"human trafficking (forcing someone into labor or sex acts against their will) is a $9.5 billion industry in the USA — to pick a random comparison, that’s four times what the Burger King chain takes in

"Recent stats found 83 percent of sex trafficking incidents in the U.S. involved victims that were U.S. citizens, and nearly half of those were minors — just like I was. It’s estimated that right now 300,000 kids are in this situation or are at risk. Just this June, the FBI freed 168 kids who’d been sold into sex slavery across 106 American cities. Since 2008, at least 4,000 kids have been freed from similar operations. Six years. So, yeah, my story is as isolated an incident as the existence of Walmart stores.”

(via suzvoy)

Filed under tw: abuse tw: rape